17th January 2018

The Women’s Rugby World Cup in 2017 was the best one yet, with the skills, tactics and energy created in the final between New Zealand and England, gender was thrown out the window and has become a memorable match for rugby fans all around the world. While it is at such a high, the series just gone is more than enough to confirm how popular womens rugby has become in the past few years.

Breaking the mold

 The final between New Zealand and England broke the record for most tickets sold at a women’s match. Fifteen thousand tickets were sold, and over two and a half million viewers tuned in and watched from their televisions. That’s second to how many viewed the semi final between france and England, which collected a total of just under three and a half million viewers watching. This is partially down to it being aired on ITV for the first time, giving viewers free access to watch and take part in such a spectacular event.

So what now?

Though it would be a panic that many of the England team players are due to retire soon, we are not running out of potential, not with over eighteen thousand players across England. While England are starting their training for the Six Nations this year, teams have been popping up all over the UK, from the West Leeds Eagles to the Eccles Ladies.

The rise in popularity doesn’t just speak for rugby, however, but last years events has proven that reputations are certainly changing for women’s sport as a whole. Women’s rugby appears to be taking the lead in popularity, but it is currently still a slow change. Nevertheless, this isn’t something to be viewed as discouraging. If it were to become too popular too fast, it will be sure to pass like a phase. If it’s to rise slowly, however, it is more likely to stick around and remain a sport the viewers find worth watching.

Staying Relevant

In order to see how women’s rugby is to stay on top, it’s important to look at what’s going on around the UK. From primary school touch rugby, to university leagues, there are plenty of ways in which women are getting involved and embracing the sport. Manchester university are currently at the top of the league against other northern universities, with MMU not far behind.

Touch Rugby, held in primary schools, is a mixed gendered game which has risen in popularity and follows less physical game play for those of a younger age to take part in. This is a great way to build up a big fan base from a young age.

Teams around the UK are growing rapidly and Macclesfield is now adding itself to the list by building up its own women’s side and are currently looking for aspiring players to join and train up for future games.

Why join?

Rugby is much more than throwing a ball around while knocking each other over. In fact, it requires a flare of elegance to organise fifteen players with individual roles to fit into a well coordinated, subtle whole. You are one person, but you are also everyone else on your side, just like a family.

It’s a wonderful sport for pushing your physical boundaries and building up strength you probably didn’t know you had. Training on and off the pitch, you will work together to challenge one another and become stronger as one. You become someone to lean on, while having fourteen others there to do the same in return.

If you think Macclesfield Women’s Rugby is the place for you, then please contact us and sign up today! We can’t wait to have you on our team.